Sharon Ann Wikoff

Create a life-style with daily practices that support YOU in your Be-coming!   

Sharon Ann Wikoff

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Sitting in Silence


As you take time to sit in silence, the mind begins to quiet.  Allowing the mind to quiet as well as the body, allows you to get in touch with another aspect of your nature, your "Being".  Your "Being" can only be heard in the quiet, in the silence, in the stillness.  Your "Being" can bring new awareness' to your attention.  You can learn about your self during these periods of silence.  Sitting in the morning and evening can be a very beneficial practice. Making such a practice part of your daily life-style can bring continuity, predictability and a sense of order to your day.  Experiment!  Keeping a journal about your experience can be very useful.  


Meditation is often the name given to this process.  However, just the word itself, "meditation" often brings many expectations with it.  So when we think of it as just sitting in the silence, it keeps the process very simple. When sitting in silence, you want to consider two different aspects. Both are part of the process. 


OUTER SILENCE:  Whenever possible sit in an environment that is as quiet as possible.  This will allow you to more easily create inner silence.  And yet if the outer environment is somewhat noisy, you can use the circumstances as an opportunity to strengthen your mind toward stillness and silence. 


INNER SILENCE:  To develop inner silence, you can focus the mind on the breath and/or any sensations you may feel in your body.  When you give the mind a point of focus, it's easier to keep the mind still and not running off with other thoughts. If you have a sensation in your body and focus your attention on it, it may "speak" to you...reveal something to you. Your body holds much wisdom. Allowing your body to speak to you is a practice and can be very informative.  


Honor the time you decide to sit. If you decide to sit for 30 minutes, be sure and do so, even if your sitting time has been restless or you feel unproductive.  Honor your original decision.  Whenever I've been tempted to cut my practice short, I've found it very powerful to continue the sit.  When I stay that remaining 10 or 15 minutes, things often shift.  My body may settle in ever more, or there is a greater sense of peace or an important insight comes. 


Be patient with yourself, if you are just beginning this process.  Sitting in silence is a "practice".  Therefore, we must "practice" it...before we will become proficient at it.